Calculating batting average

When figuring or calculating batting average of a baseball player, just use the following formula:

Batting average = (Number of hits)/(Number of official at bats)

As you can see, the batting average is just a ratio of the "number of times the player hit the ball" to "at bats"

The higher this average or the closer the average is to 1, the better the player hits. Therefore, the formula above is a measurement of how well the player hits.

When computing this average, we usually round decimal answers to three places

Calculating batting average with a few examples


Example #1:

A player hits safely 34 times.

the player was at bats 45 times

What is the player's batting average?

Batting average = (Number of hits)/(Number of official at bats)

Batting average = (34)/(45)

Batting average = 0.755555555555

After rounding to three decimals place, we get 0.755

As you can see here, this is a very good score that no human beings have ever met.


Example #2:

A player hits safely 15 times.

the player was at bats 30 times

What is the player's batting average?

Batting average = (Number of hits)/(Number of official at bats)

Batting average = (15)/(30)

Batting average = 0.5

After rounding to three decimals place, we get 0.500


Example #3:

A player hits safely 24 times.

The player was at bats 64 times

What is the player's batting average?

Batting average = (Number of hits)/(Number of official at bats)

Batting average = (24)/(64)

Batting average = 0.375

Here, the answer is already rounded to 3 decimals places.


Ty cobb, one of the greatest at bats, has a record of 0.366

Example #4:

A player hits safely 10 times.

The player was at bats 26 times

What is the player's batting average?

Batting average = (Number of hits)/(Number of official at bats)

Batting average = (10)/(26)

Batting average = 0.38461

After rounding to three decimals place, we get 0.385


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