Orthographic drawing

An orthographic drawing is a drawing that shows the top view, front view, and right-side view of a three-dimensional figure. We can also simply call the right-side view side view.

Here is how to make an orthographic drawing of the three-dimensional figure above. 

Before you do the drawing, you need to clearly label or identify the front view, top view, and the right-side view. 

For some three-dimensional figures such as a refrigerator, is it easy to identify the top view, the side view, and the front view. These views are all rectangles. However, for a figure like the one below, it can become very challenging. This will require a lot of visual-spacial intelligence!

Here is what you will see when you are looking at the drawing from the front. The front view is perhaps the easiest one to visualize in this case. Therefore, I will start with the view from front first.

Front view of an orthographic drawing

Front view of an isometric drawing

I know it can be tricky and confusing. Look at the figure multiple times and try to visualize what you will see if you were looking at it in real life. 

Right side view of the figure above

Here is what you will see when you are looking at the drawing from the right side.  The view from the right is not very complicated to visualize in my opinion. It is possible that some people may find it even easier to visualize than the view from the front.

Right side view of an isometric drawing

Notice the use of dashed lines to show a hidden edge. Whenever, you are making an orthographic drawing, always use dashed lines to represent edges that you cannot see. It is important to put these dashed lines since people may misinterpret these drawing if you do not!

Top view of the figure above.

Here is what you will see when you are looking at the drawing from top. The view from top is perhaps the most difficult one to visualize in this case in my opinion.

Notice the green and the red lines. These solid lines show visible edges. These are edges that you do not see on the drawing. However, you see them when you look from the top.

Now, try looking for three-dimensional figures in your house and see if you can identify the top view, side view, and front view of these figures.

Recent Articles

  1. Factoring trinomials of the form x^2 + bx + c

    Jul 03, 20 09:51 AM

    factoring trinomials (ax^2 + bx + c ) when a is equal to 1 is the goal of this lesson.

    Read More

New math lessons

Your email is safe with us. We will only use it to inform you about new math lessons.

                                 Follow me on Pinterest

Real Life Math Skills

Learn about investing money, budgeting your money, paying taxes, mortgage loans, and even the math involved in playing baseball.